Digital Marketing

How to make your document look attractive

If you’re like most professionals, you want your documents to look attractive and polished. However, you may not know where to start or what tools to use. In this post, we’ll show you how to make your documents look their best. We’ll also recommend some helpful tools to get the job done. So whether you’re a business owner, student, or just need to create a document for work, read on for tips on making it look great!

Hire a graphic designer

If you’re serious about making your document look attractive, consider hiring a professional graphic designer. A trained eye can quickly turn an unkempt Word document into something that’s easy on the eyes and makes sense to readers. Graphic designers also know the latest styles, colors, layouts, fonts, and design trends so they can help you make your document visually appealing. Of course, this isn’t always possible or budget friendly. So if you don’t want to hire someone else to design your documents for you, read on!

Readers should be able to focus on reading

The key to making all of your documents look good is ensuring that readers are able to easily read them without any distractions. If it looks good, then good—but just having an attractive document is not the goal. Make sure you avoid these common mistakes in order to create a nice-looking document that’s easy on the eyes. A1office provides a docx editor that can help you create a document that goes easy on the eyes

Fonts are important

Fonts can make or break your documents. You want to ensure that you choose one that’s easy on the eyes and makes sense for readability. Serif fonts (with the little feet) are generally easier to read than sans serif fonts (without feet). So if it’s appropriate for your document, use a serif font like Times New Roman or Garamond. If you’re looking for something more modern, Helvetica is an excellent choice. Just avoid Comic Sans unless your readers are children; it’s not appropriate for serious documents.

Readers prefer black text

Black text is easy to read compared with colored or off-black text, so it’s ideal if you want your document to look good. Avoid light gray backgrounds as well because they’re harder to read than white. White is the easiest on the eyes, followed by light gray and then dark gray/charcoal colors. However even black isn’t perfect, so make sure that there are enough breaks between headings and paragraphs or large sections of body copy. You can also use grayscale colors sparingly, perhaps in the footer section of a long single-column report.

Use high resolution images

A timely article won’t do any good if readers can’t see your images. Make sure that you only use high-resolution images of at least 300dpi, especially if you’re uploading them to an online article or publishing them in a magazine. If the image will be printed, then make sure that it’s large enough and high quality; don’t cut off parts of the image and try to focus on one main part.

Colorful graphs and charts can help

As we mentioned earlier, white backgrounds are ideal for documents—but they can also be boring. A good way to break up solid blocks of text is with colorful graphs or charts; these look appealing and make readers more interested as well as adding visual interest to an otherwise plain document. Just make sure that you choose colorful graphics that are appropriate to the subject. For example, red and orange are good colors for contrasting with black text, so they can be used for emphasis in graphs or charts about global warming.

Stick with standard shapes

Shapes like stars and hearts are cute but inappropriate in many professional documents. Stick to circles, squares, triangles, and other basic shapes when designing graphs or pie charts; you want your readers to focus on the data not the graphics themselves. If you’re making a graph or chart that shows proportions of different quantities then stick with bars for straight comparisons between numbers instead of using curvy lines—your readers won’t be able to make accurate judgments this way.

Use color sparingly

As we mentioned earlier, too much color can distract your readers. So if you want to add bits of color, make sure it’s appropriateHow to make your document look attractive

If you’re like most professionals, you want your documents to look attractive and polished. However, you may not know where to start or what tools to use. In this post, we’ll show you how to make your documents look their best. We’ll also recommend some helpful tools to get the job done. So whether you’re a business owner, student, or just need to create a document for work, read on for tips on making it look great!

Hire a graphic designer

If you’re serious about making your document look attractive, consider hiring a professional graphic designer. A trained eye can quickly turn an unkempt Word document into something that’s easy on the eyes and makes sense to readers. Graphic designers also know the latest styles, colors, layouts, fonts, and design trends so they can help you make your document visually appealing. Of course, this isn’t always possible or budget friendly. So if you don’t want to hire someone else to design your documents for you, read on!

Readers should be able to focus on reading

The key to making all of your documents look good is ensuring that readers are able easily read them without any distractions. If it looks good, then good—but just having an attractive document is not the goal. Make sure you avoid these common mistakes in order to create a nice-looking document that’s easy on the eyes:

Fonts are important

Fonts can make or break your documents. You want to ensure that you choose one that’s easy on the eyes and makes sense for readability. Serif fonts (with the little feet) are generally easier to read than sans serif fonts (without feet). So if it’s appropriate for your document, use a serif font like Times New Roman or Garamond. If you’re looking for something more modern, Helvetica is an excellent choice. Just avoid Comic Sans unless your readers are children; it’s not appropriate for serious documents.

Readers prefer black text

Black text is easy to read compared with colored or off-black text, so it’s ideal if you want your document to look good. Avoid light gray backgrounds as well because they’re harder to read than white. White is the easiest on the eyes, followed by light gray and then dark gray/charcoal colors. However even black isn’t perfect, so make sure that there are enough breaks between headings and paragraphs or large sections of body copy. You can also use grayscale colors sparingly, perhaps in the footer section of a long single-column report.

Use high resolution images

A timely article won’t do any good if readers can’t see your images. Make sure that you only use high-resolution images of at least 300dpi, especially if you’re uploading them to an online article or publishing them in a magazine. If the image will be printed, then make sure that it’s large enough and high quality; don’t cut off parts of the image and try to focus on one main part.

Colorful graphs and charts can help

As we mentioned earlier, white backgrounds are ideal for documents—but they can also be boring. A good way to break up solid blocks of text is with colorful graphs or charts; these look appealing and make readers more interested as well as adding visual interest to an otherwise plain document. Just make sure that you choose colorful graphics that are appropriate to the subject. For example, red and orange are good colors for contrasting with black text, so they can be used for emphasis in graphs or charts about global warming.

Stick with standard shapes

Shapes like stars and hearts are cute but inappropriate in many professional documents. Stick to circles, squares, triangles, and other basic shapes when designing graphs or pie charts; you want your readers to focus on the data not the graphics themselves. If you’re making a graph or chart that shows proportions of different quantities then stick with bars for straight comparisons between numbers instead of using curvy lines—your readers won’t be able to make accurate judgments this way.

Use color sparingly

As we mentioned earlier, too much color can distract your readers. So if you want to add bits of color, make sure it’s appropriate and used sparingly; try using a colored border around the edge of each page or in headers on different sections of an article. This way, your readers won’t be distracted by too many colors at once and they’ll be able to easily see where different parts begin and end.

Use images for white space

If you’re creating a long document like a report or report, break it up with images throughout—not only can this make it more colorful but it will also create breaks between text that makes reading easier on the eyes. Avoid using large blocks of solid copy because readers tend to get bored and will pay less attention

 and used sparingly; try using a colored border around the edge of each page or in headers on different sections of an article. This way, your readers won’t be distracted by too many colors at once and they’ll be able to easily see where different parts begin and end.

Use images for white space

If you’re creating a long document like a report or report, break it up with images throughout—not only can this make it more colorful but it will also create breaks between text that makes reading easier on the eyes. Avoid using large blocks of solid copy because readers tend to get bored and will pay less attention

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